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INTRODUCTION

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There are many conditions that can have truncal involvement. This section focuses on some common eruptions that frequently affect the trunk: papulosquamous disorders; urticarial and morbilliform disorders; blistering disorders; and miscellaneous disorders. Urticaria and angioedema are discussed in chapter 14, "Anaphylaxis, Allergies, and Angioedema." Although the truncal location of an eruption can be a helpful clue for diagnosis, the clinical appearance of the lesions and overall assessment of the patient are needed to make the correct diagnosis.

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PAPULOSQUAMOUS DISORDERS

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Scaling conditions include psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, tinea corporis, pityriasis ("tinea") versicolor, eczema/atopic dermatitis, lichen planus, secondary syphilis, and scabies. Table 251-1 lists common features distinguishing these eruptions.

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TABLE 251-1Comparison Features of Common Papulosquamous Eruptions
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PSORIASIS

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Psoriasis is discussed in detail in chapter 253, "Skin Disorders: Extremities." Stress or alcohol ingestion can be associated with a flare of psoriasis. The following medications can also be related to an exacerbation: steroid withdrawal, lithium, β-blockers, interferon, and antimalarials.1 The differential diagnosis is listed in Table 251-1.

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Diagnosis is clinical. The disorder is characterized ...

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