Skip to Main Content

  icon Rare
  icon Not so common
  icon Common
  icon Low morbidity
  icon Considerable morbidity
  icon Serious

++

The Color Atlas and Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology is proposed as a “field guide” to the recognition of skin disorders and their management. The skin is a treasury of important lesions that can usually be recognized clinically. Gross morphology in the form of skin lesions remains the hard core of dermatologic diagnosis, and therefore this text is accompanied by 900 color photographs illustrating skin diseases, skin manifestations of internal diseases, infections, tumors, and incidental skin findings in otherwise-well individuals. We have endeavored to include information relevant to gender dermatology and a large number of images showing skin disease in different ethnic populations. This Atlas covers the entire field of clinical dermatology but does not include very rare syndromes or conditions. With respect to these the reader is referred to another McGraw-Hill Publication: Fitzpatrick’s Dermatology in General Medicine, 7th ed., 2008, edited by Klaus Wolff, Lowell A. Goldsmith, Stephen I. Katz, Barbara A. Gilchrest, Amy S. Paller, and David J. Leffell.

++

This text is intended for all physicians and other health care providers, including medical students, dermatology residents, internists, oncologists, and infectious disease specialists dealing with diseases with skin manifestations. For non-dermatologists, it is advisable to start with “Approach to Dermatologic Diagnosis” and “Outline of Dermatologic Diagnosis,” below, to familiarize themselves with the principles of dermatologic nomenclature and lines of thought.

++

The Atlas is organized in 4 Parts, subdivided into 36 Sections, and there are 4 short Appendices. Each section has a color label that is reflected by the bar on the top of each page. This is to help the reader to find his or her bearings rapidly when leafing through the book. Also, the first page of each section carries an “icon,” i.e., a small photograph of a condition that is representative for that particular section.

++

Each disease is labeled with little symbols to provide first-glance information on incidence (squares) and morbidity (circles).

++

Image not available. rare Image not available. low morbidity

++

Image not available. not so common Image not available. considerable morbidity

++

Image not available. common Image not available. serious

++

For instance, the symbols Image not available.Image not available. for melanoma are meant to indicate that melanoma is common and serious. There are also some variations in this symbology. For instance, Image not available. Image not available. Image not available. means that the disease is rare but may be common in specific populations or in endemic regions or in epidemics. Another example Image not available. Image not available. Image not available. indicates that the disease causes considerable morbidity and may become serious. In addition, each disease is labeled with the respective ICD9/10 codes.

++

There are two distinct clinical situations regarding the nature of skin changes:

++

  • I. The skin changes are incidental findings in well individuals noted during the routine general physical examination
  • • “Bumps and blemishes”: many asymptomatic lesions that are medically inconsequential may be present in well persons and are not the reason for the visit to the physician; every general physician should be able to recognize these lesions to differentiate them ...

Pop-up div Successfully Displayed

This div only appears when the trigger link is hovered over. Otherwise it is hidden from view.