Skip to Main Content

++

ICD-9 : 995.2 • ICD : 10 : T88.7 Image not available. Image not available.

++

  • Adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDRs) are common in hospitalized (2–3%) as well as in ambulatory patients (>1%).
  • Most reactions are mild, accompanied by pruritus, and resolve promptly after the offending drug is discontinued.
  • Severe, life-threatening ACDRs do occur and are unpredictable.
  • Drug eruptions can mimic virtually all the morphologic expressions in dermatology and must be the first consideration in the differential diagnosis of a suddenly appearing eruption.
  • Drug eruptions are caused by immunologic or nonimmunologic mechanisms and are provoked by systemic or topical administration of a drug.
  • The majority are based on a hypersensitivity mechanism and are thus immunologic and may be of types I, II, III, or IV.

++

Classification

++

Immunologically Mediated ACDR

++

See Table 22-1. It should be noted, however, that classification of immunologically mediated ACDR according to the Gell and Coombs classification is an oversimplification because in most reactions both cellular and humoral immune reactions are involved. Nonimmunologic reactions are summarized in Table 22-2.

++
Table Graphic Jump Location
Table 22-1 Immunologically Mediated Adverse Cutaneous Drug Reactions*
++
Table Graphic Jump Location
Table 22-2 Nonimmunologic Drug Eruptions
++

Guidelines for Assessment of Possible ACDRs

++

  • Exclude alternative causes, especially infections, in that many infections (especially viral) are difficult to distinguish clinically from the adverse effects of drugs used to treat infections.
  • Examine interval between introduction of a ...

Want remote access to your institution's subscription?

Sign in to your MyAccess profile while you are actively authenticated on this site via your institution (you will be able to verify this by looking at the top right corner of the screen - if you see your institution's name, you are authenticated). Once logged in to your MyAccess profile, you will be able to access your institution's subscription for 90 days from any location. You must be logged in while authenticated at least once every 90 days to maintain this remote access.

Ok

About MyAccess

If your institution subscribes to this resource, and you don't have a MyAccess profile, please contact your library's reference desk for information on how to gain access to this resource from off-campus.

Subscription Options

AccessEmergency Medicine Full Site: One-Year Subscription

Connect to the full suite of AccessEmergency Medicine content and resources including advanced 8th edition chapters of Tintinalli’s, high-quality procedural videos and images, interactive board review, an integrated drug database, and more.

$595 USD
Buy Now

Pay Per View: Timed Access to all of AccessEmergency Medicine

24 Hour Subscription $34.95

Buy Now

48 Hour Subscription $54.95

Buy Now

Pop-up div Successfully Displayed

This div only appears when the trigger link is hovered over. Otherwise it is hidden from view.